To The Gifted Person Pt. 2

ruining-the-curve
The inner war every gifted person has experienced in their life.

You’ve probably heard about gifted children. Children that are misunderstood in school, and need “higher learning”. Those children grow up, that’s how time works. So aren’t gifted adults in the news. Just because in they’re grown up they have everything figured out because they pay taxes and have a job? The ratio for resources for gifted children to resources for gifted adults are not balanced in the slightest. After hours of searching, I finally found one person that address gifted adults. Your Rainforest Mind is a blog also on WordPress and is place that I’ll go whenever I feel lonely and need to feel like I’m not alone.

To the Gifted Person

maxresdefaultI’m gifted. That doesn’t mean that I’m good everything. Or that I like Science, and Math. In fact, I hate those classes. The post titled “What I Am” is a person’s definition of being gifted. Only 6-10% of the student population in the US is considered gifted (source). This makes it very lonely for these children, because no one is ever on the same page, on the same frequency. I want this gifted people to know that even though you may feel like you are the only gifted person in the world, you are not alone. I’m here for you, if you want to talk, vent, or just say hi, I will be here, because it’s a terrible feeling, not being able to have a best friend, or not liking movie theaters because the sound is too loud, or not liking extroverts, because it’s too much energy. I understand and there many other people feeling the same way. No matter how much you feel like it, you are not alone!

New Purpose 

Just to restate what I said a few posts ago, this blog is a median for me to express my creativity, whether  it be writing, pictures, quotes, et cetera. I want to turn this into a fashion blog, but who knows if  that’ll actually happen because of procrastination.

What I Am

The truly creative mind in any field is no more than this: A human creature born abnormally inhumanly sensitive.

To him/her/them…  

a touch is a blow,

a sound is a noise,

a misfortune is a tragedy,

a joy is an ecstasy,

a friend is a lover,

a lover is a god,

and failure is death.

Add to this cruelly delicate organism the overpowering necessity to create, create, create– – – so that without the creating of music or poetry or books or buildings or something of meaning, his/her/their very breath is cut off from him/her/them. He/She/They must create, must pour out creation. By some strange, unknown, inward urgency he/she/they is not really alive unless he/she/they is creating.

-Pearl Buck-

She’s such a genius

Creation seems to come out of imperfection. It seems to come out of a striving and a frustration and this is where I think language came from. I mean, it came from our desire to transcend our isolation and have some sort of connection with one another. And it had to be easy when it was just simple survival. Like you know, “water.” We came up with a sound for that. Or saber tooth tiger right behind you. We came up with a sound for that. But when it gets really interesting I think is when we use that same system of symbols to communicate all the abstract and intangible things that we’re experiencing. What is like… frustration? Or what is anger or love? When I say love, the sound comes out of my mouth and it hits the other person’s ear, travels through this byzantine conduit in their brain through their memories of love or lack of love, and they register what I’m saying and they say yes, they understand. But how do I know they understand? Because words are inert. They’re just symbols. They’re dead, you know? And so much of our experience is intangible. So much of what we perceive cannot be expressed. It’s unspeakable. And yet you know, when we communicate with one another and we feel that we have connected and we think that we’re understood I think we have a feeling of almost spiritual communion. And that feeling might be transient, but I think it’s what we live for.

~ Kim Krizan (Waking Life, 2001)